Events

Elliot Anderson

Tour of the Monuments of Silicon Valley

Location

IBM Site
5500 Cottle Road San Jose, CA 95123
United States
37° 15' 5.76" N, 121° 48' 14.1876" W
Tour of the Monuments of Silicon Valley: An Augmented Reality History of Silicon Valley's Most Polluted Sites
 
Twenty-nine Superfund sites are located Silicon Valley, the largest concentration in the U.S. The public is not always aware of these sites and their degree of toxicity. Many of these sites lie underneath suburban neighborhoods without obvious signs of pollution. In the past Silicon Valley Toxics Coalition (SVTC) – a research, advocacy and grassroots environmental justice organization - offered tours of these sites educating the public about the realities of technology production and its byproducts.  However, because most of the pollution is in the groundwater participants found it difficult to fully envision the problem.

In response to the need to tell this historically important story a custom Augmented Reality Software (ARS) app was developed creating a unique, interactive documentary tour about the Superfund sites of Silicon Valley.  Using the ARS app running on smart devices tour participants hear, see and interact with the history of the site and people affected by environmental pollution. 

The ARS Application running on the iPhone and iPad utilizes GPS capabilities to locate a viewer. The viewer points the device at the landscape and the App overlays real time video from the device’s camera with text, images, interactive 3D graphics, and animations accompanied by sound recording particular to the viewer's location. The software enables an interactive interpretively rich lens through which participants can fully experience the landscape and its history. Participants on the tour wander the site with a device and encounter this history through the voices, science and stories connected to its legacy of pollution.

A few iPads will be available to tour participants.  The iPad/iPhone App will be available free through the App Store online. The tour will last approximately 1 1/2 hours, including bus ride. A shuttle to the site will be provided. Sign up now!

 
Project info: 

Silicon Valley Toxic Tours will take place from the ZERO1 Garage
September 15, 2012
First Tour: Bus leaves at 11:00am. Tour begins at 11:30am
Second Tour: Bus leaves at 2:00pm. Tour begins at 2:30pm

Tour lasts approximately 1 1/2 hours

Participants may provide their own transportation to the site.

Elliot Anderson

lives in San Francisco and works in Santa Cruz

Anderson studied Computer Engineering at Northeastern University (Boston, MA), and worked as an engineer before completing a BA in Art and an MA in Creative Arts and Interdisciplinary Studies from San Francisco State University.

He is an Associate Professor of Art and Digital Art and New Media at the University of California Santa Cruz and Co-Directs the Social Practice and Arts Research Center (SPARC).

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September 15

ZERO1 Garage

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Bay Area Glass Institute

Locations

United States
United States
37° 21' 11.3184" N, 121° 53' 30.2496" W
You Design It - We Make It
Project info: 

Sept 15, 2012
2-10pm
401 E Taylor St, San Jose, CA
Free Admission

September 15, 2012

Bay Area Glass Institute

The mission of the Bay Area Glass Institute (BAGI) is to make the celebration of glass art accessible to all and provide continued artistic and educational growth to artists, patrons and the community.

Silicon Valley is known as a place for new and emergent technology. One thing that drives this development is the community’s overarching culture of exchange that bridges the gap between different ideas and disciplines. People don’t often recognize that there is an important connection between technology and art. They both require a high level of innovation, collaboration and experimentation. Advancements in technology continually open possibilities for creating exciting new art forms and vice versa. Today, it is becoming harder to separate where technology ends and where art begins. Glass blowing has been around for over two millennia. Although the techniques and tools have not changed much over the years, recent advancements in technology have significantly changed the face of glass.

Historically, glass was made exclusively in large factories by teams of glassblowers. With the development of smaller more efficient furnaces in the 1960‘s came the creation of private glassblowing studios and new possibilities for the individual artist to work with glass. This year we celebrate Fifty Years of the Studio Glass Movement and the advent of new technology. The Bay Area Glass Institute invites you to our studio to watch as innovation and experimentation come to life. Come watch as teams of glass artists collaborate, create and sculpt 2000 degree molten glass. We have lined up an All-Star cast of some of the best glass makers in the Bay Area to create your designs in glass. In this interactive program, local and internationally known glass artists will choose designs presented to them by the audience then collaborate to make them in glass. Audience participation is not only encouraged but is essential to the spirit of innovation and exploration. Along with the glass blowing, we will have fusing and flame working demonstrations happening throughout the day. Finished pieces will be on display throughout the ZERO1 Biennial in BAGI's Gallery.

Date: September 15, 2012

You Design It – We Make It
September 15, 2012

Presented by Bay Area Glass Institute

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Nicholas de Monchaux

The Museum and the Virtual City

Location

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive, Woo Hon Fai Hall
2625 Durant Avenue #2250 Berkeley, CA 94720-2250
United States
37° 52' 5.4696" N, 122° 15' 22.3956" W

Presented by UC Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

How does twenty-first-century technology dissolve and expand such a quintessentially nineteenth-century institution as the educational museum? How can the architectural traditions of ordering knowledge in the museum expand and refine our models for knowledge in the virtual world? Nicholas de Monchaux examines these and other questions in a live, online lecture and discussion, drawing on the UC Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive's strategic planning process, as well as on his own work on new forms of digital urbanism. De Monchaux is assistant professor of Architecture and Urban Design at UC Berkeley and chair of the BAM/PFA Academic Advisory Committee.

Online interactive presentation
Live webcast here!

Project info: 

September 13, 2012
3:00 p.m.
Online interactive talk
Details TBA

Nicholas de Monchaux

Nicholas de Monchaux is an architect who works at the urban intersection of ecology and infrastructure. The author of Spacesuit: Fashioning Apollo (MIT Press, 2011), an Architectural history of the Apollo 11 Extra-vehicular garment, he is currently Assistant Professor of Architecture and Urban Design at UC Berkeley. His work on the ecological design of vacant publically-owned land has been exhibited at the Biennial of the Americas, and SFMOMA, and will be featured in the US Pavillion of the 13th Venice Architecture Biennale.

Artist website: 
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September 13, 2012

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

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ATC: UC Berkeley's Center for New Media

Location

United States
37° 52' 28.9596" N, 122° 15' 30.1968" W
Lecture: Ryan and Trevor Oakes

September 17, 2012

ATC: UC Berkeley's Center for New Media

ATC: The Art, Technology, and Culture Colloquium, UC Berkeley's Center for New Media
Berkeley's ATC lecture series is an internationally known forum for presenting new ideas that challenge conventional wisdom about technology and culture. This series, free of charge and open to the public, presents artists, writers, curators, and scholars who consider contemporary issues at the intersection of aesthetic expression, emerging technologies, and cultural history, from a critical perspective.

Lecture: Ryan and Trevor Oakes
Monday, September 17, 2012 7:30 PM
Banatao Auditorium, Sutardja Dai Hall, UC Berkeley
Co-presented by the Art, Technology and Culture Colloquium, Berkeley Center for New Media and UCB Department of Art Practice

Brothers and collaborators, Ryan and Trevor Oakes create detailed drawings which mimic both the details and the shape of human vision. Using a system of their own invention, the Oakes twins employ split focus and a curved easel to render illusionistic space in three dimensions on a two-dimensional surface. Sculptures in cardboard and early matchstick studies further articulate the artists' conception of light rays as they intersect with the human eye to create images of space and volume. 

Ryan and Trevor Oakes received BFAs from The Cooper Union School of Art in 2004. The New York-based artists have had solo exhibitions at CUE Art Foundation, New York, and the Spertus Museum, Chicago. The artists have had residencies at the Getty Center, Los Angeles, Palazzo Strozzi Museum, Florence, Italy, and the Field Museum, Chicago.

 

Lecture: Ryan and Trevor Oakes Monday
September 17, 2012 7:30 PM
Banatao Auditorium, Sutardja Dai Hall, UC Berkeley

Co-presented by the Art, Technology and Culture Colloquium, Berkeley Center
for New Media and UCB Department of Art Practice

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