South Bay

Ellen Lake

Crossing

"Crossing" is a short video exploring the evolution of technology and the fluid nature of time and space. This new video is an extension of a work-in-progress, “Film at 11,” a multi-platform project combining vintage home movies with digital media today to explore relationships between past/present and the perception of time/memory. For a brief period (1939-1942) the diacetate Kodachrome film produced lush color that appears today perfectly preserved, as opposed to triacetate film (post 1942) that does not hold up nearly as well. I’ve been mining 16mm films from that picture-perfect era to use in new work that explores time and technology. This series involves staged interventions that combine contemporary elements with old films and film stills to create digital prints and short animations. For “Crossing,” I’m taking two figures, holding hands and crossing a road (filmed in 1939) and shooting site-specific footage in San Jose and combining those elements for the urban screen.

Project info: 

September 15, 2012, 11am - 6pm
S. 1st Street (from San Carlos to Reed)
SoFA District, San Jose

Ellen Lake

lives and works in Oakland, CA

Ellen Lake is an artist working with old and new media. Thinking about the rapid evolution in technology, how often something is lost to make way for something new, her projects connect obsolete technology and the ever-widening range of technological media available today. Ellen received her MFA from Mills College in Oakland, California in 2002. She is a recipient of a 2012 Experimental Media Arts Lab residency at Stanford University, 2009 Sarah Jacobson Film Grant and 2005/2006 Bay Area Video Coalition Mediamaker Award.

Artist website: 
Artist twitter: 
Yes

September 15, 2012

SoFA District

no

Pierce Warnecke

Used News

Commissioned by ZERO1, the San Jose Public Art Program, and Metro Newspaper, with support from the National Endowment for the Arts and the San Jose Downtown Association.

USED NEWS is a newspaper mash-up, a visual remix of Silicon Valley through its printed voice - the Metro newspaper - that will be exhibited as part of the ArtHERE program at Metro (550 S. 1st Street) from September 12-December 8, 2012.

A small public and portable video station in the entrance to the Metro building where participants can manipulate printed editions of Metro in front of a microscope camera. The camera is connected to custom video sampling software based on the idea of stop-motion animation, and uses a system of storage and playback to accumulate user-made videos. If no one is present a default video (5min) will play looped. As soon as the camera is moved, the software switches to record mode, and a small button allows users to record when they’re ready. The entire system is housed within the station, and is on wheels. This allows it to easily be moved or stored inside if need be.

The use of a microscope lets users zoom in up to 200 times on the newspapers, giving extreme details and allowing them to explore the newspaper on an in depth, quasi-pixel level. Fibrous textures, parts of words, pieces of imagery appear and can almost be recognized, briefly placing the viewer into the reality of contemporary information. Yet the meanings of these words and illustrations cannot be grasped in full; only parts of their shapes, colors and contrasts are visible through the microscope. The result is an abstract micro exploration of Metro’s articles. Seeking Silicon Valley…via user-made video mash-ups of it’s printed voice.

The videos made by users are stored and then played back on an LCD screen fixed on the station. A second VGA cable is available for setting up a projector either in front of metro news for façade activation on special occasions (i.e. the Biennale weekend), or else on the inside of the building to rear-project on the left ground-floor window. The idea of filming extreme close-ups and projected them in blown-up proportions onto the building gives an interesting contrast that will attract the attention of street-goers.

Project info: 

This project will be exhibited as 
part of the ArtHERE program at 
Metro Newspaper (550 S. 1st Street) 
from September 12-December 8, 2012. 
Opening hours TBD

Pierce Warnecke

lives and works in Berlin, Germany

Pierce Warnecke’s work stems from his interest in the effects of time on matter: modification, deterioration and disappearance. Whether focus is on the purity of digital forms or the chaotic grit of natural objects, large scales of time and space or microscopic detail, the goal of Pierce’s work is to readapt existing materials into a parallel context where their signified meanings, symbols and cultural connections have become residual ghosts.

No

September 12-December 8, 2012

Metro

no

Kimberlee Koym-Murteira

The Fractured Weave

Commissioned by ZERO1, the San Jose Public Art Program, and the San Jose Museum of Quilts & Textiles, with support from the National Endowment for the Arts and the San Jose Downtown Association.

The Fractured Weave is a plastic curtain assembled of repurpose materials that will be exhibited as part of the ArtHERE program at the San Jose Museum of Quilts and Textiles (520 S. 1st Street) from September 12-December 8, 2012.

The patchwork of plastic is comprised of small plastic bags filled with viscous liquid and opaque cereal bag liners painted with oils pastels. A video projection lights and activates this translucent quilt showing images of people engaged in daily rituals around the home. The image clarity of the video in the installation will change depending on the time of day and lighting, always one will be able to see faint shadows and reflections of people and movement. When obscured the imagery becomes energetic remnants of the actions pictured. I enjoy these visual differences and opportunities to play with the idea of things that are not always available, creating interest in the viewer to explore the work more fulling, inviting them to walk inside the gallery for a differing viewpoint. Fascinated by the exchange of energy and toxic substances people share with each other and the world around them, Koym-Murteira explores the permeability of physical and psychological boundaries—with a focus on resiliency and translucency. She reflects on how technology intersects our lives and the pace of society imprints a toll on individuals. Her installations are composed of interactive machines, kinetic sculptures, videos and studies of natural phenomena, enticing the viewer to rethink ideas of reuse, toxicity, availability, activity, and beauty.

Project info: 

This project will be exhibited as 
part of the ArtHERE program at the 
San Jose Museum of Quilts & Textiles (520 S. 1st Street) 
from September 12-December 8, 2012. 
Opening hours TBD

Kimberlee Koym-Murteira

lives and works in Oakland, CA

Building on her background as a set designer for film and theatre, Kimberlee Koym-Murteira uses her video camera & projector to coax these everyday objects to become something more, heightening their dimension into the realm of fairytale.

Artist website: 
Artist twitter: 
Facebook: 

facebook.com/kimberleekoym

No

September 12-December 8, 2012

San Jose Museum of Quilts & Textiles

no

Daniel Schwartz

Silicon Valley Karaoke

Commissioned by ZERO1, the San Jose Public Art Program, and the San Jose Stage Company, with support from the National Endowment for the Arts and the San Jose Downtown Association.

Silicon Valley Karaoke is a facade projection and mobile web application piece that will be presented as part of the ArtHERE program at the San Jose Stage Company (490 S. 1st Street) from September 13-15, 2012 starting at 8:30pm each evening.

The project aims to bridge the richness of Silicon Valley technology and arts cultures, and provides the seed for an ad hoc outdoor show to form outside the theater venue - where performances are usually inside - celebrating the great collaborative and communal spirit of Silicon Valley. Another primary goal for this piece is that for everyone that encounters or participates in Silicon Valley Karaoke 1.0 to have a big smile on their face after singing, dancing, viewing, and listening. Whichever role you play, your participating and contributing “user generated content.”

Silicon Valley Karaoke 1.0 is created entirely with open and/or free Web standards and technologies such as HTML5/CSS/JS, using code to create dynamic and animated graphics and visuals whenever possible over pre-produced imagers. Using such an approach is to demonstrate the power of such technologies and their artistic merits and allow the piece to be experienced as uniquely as possible each time. I use the “1.0” suffix because this is just the beginning of what this piece can be and my aspirations for what it can become. The songs selected for this piece encompass a variety of genres and popularity but all the artists are from the Bay Area to further showcase the richness of this region. I think people will be pleasantly surprised and proud that some of these artists are from these parts.

The piece is made in two main parts: A Web-based mobile application and accompanying visual presentations. The presentation aspect uses multiple projectors to present visuals for a particular song participants are singing: fun code-based animations, YouTube clips of karaoke singers for that song, lyrics, and artist bio. To engage with the artwork, participants will scan a QR code or enter in a short Web address to access the application on their mobile device. Here users can select a song to sing, view song lyrics, listen to a song, learn more about the artist, and even purchase the song. Everyone and anyone at anytime can jump in and sing, dance, and listen along to the music. The more the merrier just like in regular karaoke!

Project info: 

This project will be exhibited as 
part of the ArtHERE program at the 
San Jose Stage Company (490 S. 1st Street) 
from September 13-15, 2012
starting at 8:30pm daily

Daniel Schwartz

lives and works in San Francisco, CA

Daniel Schwartz is an interaction designer and artist. He leads the user experience design for specific enterprise software products for a Silicon Valley company. He works in paint, html+javascript, photography, illustration, murals, and chocolate.

Artist website: 
Artist twitter: 
Facebook: 

danielnyc

No

September 13-15, 2012 from 8:30pm

San Jose Stage Company

no

Bill Washabaugh & Jeff Lieberman

The Sitting Wave

Commissioned by ZERO1, the San Jose Public Art Program, and Caffe Frascati, with support from the National Endowment for the Arts and the San Jose Downtown Association.

The Sitting Wave is a site-specific installation that will be exhibited as part of the ArtHERE program at Caffe Frascati (315 S. 1st Street) from September 12-December 8, 2012.

The Bench brings the essence of nature back into a metropolitan area through dynamic, organic motion. This bench is made of many wooden parallel slats, each individually hinged. When you sit down, the slats you sit upon lower, creating a ripple in the bench headed in both directions. Internal springs connecting the slats pull their neighbors down in response, creating a wave motion. This slow-motion liquid ripple reaches the end of the bench and reflects back. Multiple people create interacting wave patterns. The bench connects the residents of San Jose (and more specifically the visitors of Caffe Frascati) to the unification of art and technology, while reminding us of our interconnection to nature.

Project info: 

This project will be exhibited as
part of the ArtHERE program at
Caffe Frascati (315 S. 1st Street)
from September 12-December 8, 2012.
Opening hours TBD

Bill Washabaugh & Jeff Lieberman

live and work in Brooklyn, NY and Boston, MA

Bill Washabaugh has spent a decade blending engineering, science, art, and architecture. Bill has a degree in Aerospace & Mechanical Engineering from the University of Minnesota. Bill has designed airplanes for Boeing, lifting equipment for Genie Industries, and a spatula. In 2005, he founded Hypersonic Engineering & Design, a design studio in Brooklyn, New York which creates ground breaking physical interactive sculptures and consults to the aerospace, mechanical, advertising, manufacturing, and product design industries.

Artist website: 
No

September 12-December 8, 2012

Caffe Frascati

no

Lynn Cazabon & Neal McDonald

Junkspace

Presented by ZERO1, the San Jose Public Art Program, and S. 1st Biliards, with support from the National Endowment for the Arts and the San Jose Downtown Association.

Junkspace is a site-specific installation and app that will be exhibited as part of the ArtHERE program at S. 1st Billiards (420 S. 1st Street) from September 12-December 8, 2012.

Junkspace, is a time and location sensitive animation and corresponding mobile application that superimposes two forms of waste, one earth-bound (electronic waste) and the other celestial (orbital debris), and three different forms of space: outer space, physical space and virtual space. Using orbital debris tracking data published by NORAD and the GPS coordinates of the exhibition venue, the movement of animated e-waste on screen aligns with the orbital path of actual pieces of debris in orbit above the user’s location. Using the free Junkspace iOS App, viewers can obtain more information on the originating satellite or rocket, including launch date, country of origin, and purpose, by tapping on its name. 

For our installation in the ZERO1 Biennial at South First Billiards, the artists will present a series of large-scale backlit images in the front window and a customized version of Junkspace reflecting debris in orbit above San Jose for display on screens within the space. 

Project info: 

This project will be exhibited as
part of the ArtHERE program at 
S. 1st Billiards (420 S. 1st Street)
from September 12-December 8, 2012.
Opening hours TBD

Lynn Cazabon & Neal McDonald

live and work in Baltimore, MD

Lynn Cazabon and Neal McDonald are artists based in Baltimore, Maryland who collaboratively create works combining data mining, animation and photography that seek to raise awareness about pressing environmental issues. They both are on the faculty of University of Maryland, Baltimore County. They each also work independently.

Artist website: 
No

September 12-December 8, 2012

S. 1st Billiards

no

Samson Young

Signal Path II: Sinister Resonance

Presented by ZERO1, the San Jose Public Art Program, and the Downtown Yoga Shala, with support from the National Endowment for the Arts and the San Jose Downtown Association.

Signal Path II: Sinister Resonance (2011) is a site-specific sound installation that will be exhibited as part of the ArtHERE program at the Downtown Yoga Shala (450 S. 1st Street) from September 12-December 8, 2012.

During the project conception, Samson Young meditated at various locations within/around/outside of a specific installation site while wearing a sensor that turns his brainwaves into sound. Sensors monitor eight sets of electroencephalographic signals while you attempt to focus your attention. Each signal generates one sinetone or squarewave. Each tone occupies a specific frequency range. When your attention level is above a certain threshold, tones will be redistributed to approximate the harmonic series, producing a “fat,” “harmonious” sound field. Paradoxically, as soon as you became aware of the alignment of tones, you are distracted. This constant focus-distraction constitutes a perpetual signal feedback loop that “short-circuits” the sense of hearing. The sound of my meditation was recorded and played back via small media players, which were installed at the same spots where Young meditated. He now invites listeners to stand at the same spot where he meditated and listen to the continuous drones that were generated by my brain activities, while watching a video of his own full experience shot from the back. Like the listeners, in the video Young is shown standing still, listening.


Project info: 

This project will be exhibited as
part of the ArtHERE program at the
Downtown Yoga Shala (450 S. 1st Street)
from September 12-December 8, 2012.
Opening hours TBD
Free and open to the public

Samson Young

lives and works in Hong Kong, China

Samson Young (b.1979), composer, sound artist and new media artist. With formal training in music composition, his works are fundamentally informed by an engagement with new cultural-technological paradigms, yet deeply grounded in the classical musical tradition. Young’s creative output spans the widest possible range: from composition for orchestra and gameboys, to amusement ride-turned-sound installation, to ensembles of ipad and iphones, to multimedia music theatre.

Artist website: 
No

September 12-December 8, 2012

Downtown Yoga Shala

no

Rebar

The Great Room

Commissioned by ZERO1 and the San Jose Public Art Program, with support from the National Endowment for the Arts

Streetscapes are the largest component of the public realm of many cities, but the majority of that space is dedicated to moving and storing vehicles. At the same time, outdoor urban landscapes are often characterized by hard, sharp and uninviting surfaces. Rebar’s project for the ZERO1 biennial weekend in SoFA explores alternatives to the dominant paradigm by turning parking spaces into people places and inviting urban citizens to relax and play in a customized outdoor urban living room – The Great Room. Combined with the massive outdoor screen and the best SJ food trucks, The Great Room transforms a banal parking lot into a social living room for art, food and culture. Created from CNC-cut puzzle pieces and suspended fishing nets, The Great Room provides an absurd visual and tactile contrast to the typical urban hardscape and introduces features not often found in public space – large spaces suitable for swinging, eating, lounging and relaxing. Come play in The Great Room with Rebar!

Project info: 

On view in the 300 S. 1st street parking lot
September 13-15, 2012
Free and open to the public

Rebar

live and work in San Francisco, CA

Rebar is an interdisciplinary studio that creates artwork, structures, landscapes and experiences that energize the built environment and enhance the public realm. Our work is rooted in the belief that human interaction, community and a sense of wonder form the basis of the good life. We engage with large projects and small, from city and regional scale plans to objects that fit in the hand.

Artist website: 
No

September 13-15, 2012

300 S. 1st Street Parking Lot

Public Art project. On display night and day.

Freya Bardell and Brian Howe

Wired Wilderness Project

Presented by San Jose Airport’s Art + Technology Public Art Program

The Wired Wilderness Project creates a structure for an artist-in-residency program in partnership with the scientific communities of the San Jose region.  Creatively interpreting regional climate data generated by these existing institutions, artists’ projects will convey evolving issues of climate change, increase public awareness and potentially inspire behavioral change.

The framework for Wired Wilderness was developed by artists Freya Bardell and Brian Howe with ecological designer Brent Bucknum in partnership with U.C. Berkeley’s Blue Oak Ranch Reserve (BORR).  The project is conceived as a 100 year commitment; distributing the project over generations will mass a woven collection of artist visions, utilizing a variety of seeing modes, sensing technologies, and calls-to-action in the context of climate change.

Coming in October 2012 is an artwork by Bardell and Howe based on their three year association with BORR. A multimedia installation within the Apron Display Cases of the Norman Mineta Memorial San Jose International Airport, the public will engage with real-time data streams coming from the Blue Oak Ranch Reserve, a 3,500 acre University of California field station in the hillsides outside San Jose.

Data will flow from research sites to the airport and a wide variety of sciences will inform this stream for subject relevancy and technological redundancy.  Changes in climate will be documented in this two year study in the most technologically advanced means possible to the artists. High -Resolution Time-lapse photography, LIDAR, field recordings, sensor data, and satellite imagery will be collected over the two-year period. It is the artists hope that as you travel through the airport, the Wired Wilderness will serve as a reminder: that in the midst of our business and travels, nearby landscapes are telling a story of climate change; that signs often express themselves at unexpected and sometimes imperceptible time scales as a natural ‘clock’; and that through artistic interpretation of this often unseen climate data, we might better understand its impact and our role in this bigger picture.

Conversations are ongoing with scientific institutions to support ongoing realization of the residency.

Project info: 

Opens October 2012
Norman Y. Mineta San Jose International Airport
Terminal B

Freya Bardell and Brian Howe

work in Eagle Rock, LA, California

Freya Bardell and Brian Howe are the founders and creative directors of Greenmeme, a cross-disciplinary public practice based in Los Angeles. The focus of Greenmeme is the design and creation of artistic environments and sculpture that encourage public stewardship and promote environmental and cultural awareness. Greenmeme installations have been featured nationally and internationally, shown in galleries, museums, vacant lots, rivers and oceans.
Principal Investigator: Dr. Michael Hamilton, reserve director, UC Berkeley Blue Oak Ranch Reserve

Artist website: 
No

October 2012

Norman Y. Mineta San Jose International Airport, Terminal B

Public Art project. On display night and day.

San Jose City Hall

Location

United States
37° 20' 18.132" N, 121° 53' 7.1088" W
Climate Clock Initiative
Project info: 

September 12 - December 8, 2012

November 7, 2012 - December 2012

San Jose City Hall, Wing Niches

City services and employees have moved from many locations all over the city to the new headquarters on 200 East Santa Clara Street. Designed by renowned architects Richard Meier & Partners, the new San José City Hall was thoughtfully planned to make it as simple as possible to access City services.

Climate change is a cumbersome concept to grasp for most individuals and communities around the world. Beginning in Silicon Valley, an innovative opportunity exists to educate the local and global community about climate change through a dynamic work of landmark public art called Climate Clock. The Climate Clock, which has a 100-year minimum scope of operations will take the complex data around climate change and represent it in a way that makes it easy to understand and thus relevant to individuals. The Climate Clock will weave San José’s culture of technological innovation with art and climate data; creating an iconic signature work of public art for Silicon Valley that will help to measure climate change, make the process more visible, and engage and inspire individuals to personally explore and modify their carbon footprints.

100
no